My Amazing “I can’t believe it’s low carb” Oatmeal Cookie Recipe


My husband was diagnosed with diabetes last summer, and we have been on a journey of discovery in the kitchen.  Learning to cook low carb has been a fun challenge, and he has lost over 50# since we started.

He has never been big on sweets, so that part has been easier than it would be for me. Still, he occasionally does want a cookie, and his favorites are oatmeal craisin.  I have been playing with a few recipes I found online and have finally got it to what I consider the perfect cookie.

Here it is.  Don’t say I never gave ya anything.

WHAT I USED:

1/2 cups whole wheat flour

1/2 cups almond flour

1/2 cup coconut flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon allspice

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 cup butter, softened

1 cup SPLENDA® Sugar Blend

2 large eggs

1 tablespoon molasses

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3 cups steel cut oats, uncooked

1 cup craisins

1 cup chopped walnuts

 HOW I DID IT

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Stir together flours, soda, and spices in a separate bowl for later.

Beat butter and SPLENDA® Sugar Blend at medium speed in the Bosch Universal (using whisk attachment) until fluffy. Add eggs, molasses and vanilla, beating until blended. Gradually add flour mixture, beating at low speed until blended.

Change to cookie paddles, as this gets very thick and will bend your wire whips.

Stir in oats and craisins.

Drop dough by rounded tablespoons onto lightly greased baking sheets.  

Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool slightly on baking sheets. Remove to wire racks; cool completely.  The consistency of these cookies is very dense, so I like to kind of smoosh them flat after putting them on the cookie sheet, otherwise they cook in the rounded shape, and get too done on the outside and not enough on the inside.  Smooshing seems to do the trick 😉

I make a double recipe of this, unless we are having a crowd over, then I triple it.  While the first batch is baking, I drop dough as above onto a parchment lined cookie sheet (as many as will fit on that sheet, barely touching) and place in the freezer for later.  When they are frozen, I collect them all into a large ziplock baggie and keep on hand for a rainy day.  These last about forever for just the two of us, but they are nice to have on hand when the grands come over and help us eat them.


These make GREAT breakfast cookies, they are so filling and satisfying.  In the future, I may add sugar free chocolate chips to the mix, just for grins and giggles.

What’s for dinner

We are having planned-overs for dinner tonight.  Easy beef pot pie:

  • 1 leftover steak, diced
  • 1 potato, diced
  • 1 pkg. brown gravy mix
  • 1 can mixed vegetables, drained
  • 1.5 cups bizquick baking mix
  • milk – for baking mix batter

Cook potato in salted water until tender, add brown gravy (prepare according to directions, diced beef, and veggies, incorporate all together, then pour into 4×4 glass baking pan.

In a large bowl, combine baking mix with milk until consistency of pancake batter, pour over top of beef mixture.  Bake at 375* until batter is browned on top, and toothpick comes out clean when inserted into crust.

This is a great way to use up leftovers.  Mashed potatoes can be substituted for the biscuit crust, and any left over veggies would work in this.  Top with cheese and serve with a green salad and you’ve got a plate of good old fashioned comfort food, quick and easy!

Burrito mix

In my little kitchen this month, I concocted a delicious, frugal yet filling supper to feed a crowd.  I had two of my children and three of my grandchildren sharing this one, and there was still plenty leftover to pack in husband’s lunch the next day.  Here is the recipe (I loved it so much, I added it to my journal for future reference).  Enjoy.

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The Altar

The Kitchen has been called the heart of the home.  Family life is nurtured in the kitchen; conversations, tears and laughter coexist and comingle; food is prepared and consumed.  Generally, because of use and abuse, the kitchen is the messiest room in the house. If the kitchen represents the heart, the sink would be its altar.

The sink is where used vessels are gathered, scraped, washed clean, sorted and prepared for future use.  You can’t serve up a fresh hot meal on dirty dishes, now, can you?

In the same way, to be used effectively by God, we need to be cleansed regularly. Everyday use leaves the remains of what we had to offer on the surface of our heart.  Regret and unforgiveness will harden into bitterness if we are not careful to remove it promptly.   In the quiet of your kitchen, bring the dirty dishes of your life to the altar.  While you are scraping and scrubbing the congealed mess from the dishes, rinsing them clean, and putting things straight in your little kitchen, Let the Lord do the same thing on the altar of your heart.  With contrition, make a plan to right the wrongs that you have committed, and ask the Lord for the strength and resolve to follow through.  As you are putting away the clean dishes, and wiping up your workspace, thank the Lord for His goodness to you.  Ask Him to prepare you and enable you for the work that He has for you.

Regret, Guilt, and Shame are the ugly stepsisters of Contrition, the daughter of Truth and Pardon.  These stepsisters are hateful, ruthless, unforgiving, and usually gross exaggerators.  Don’t let them “help” in your kitchen.

To My Children…and their children…and their children’s (future) children

Mother’s Day typically is a day when we honor our Mothers, and if we are Mommas, we get to be honored.  I’m doing something different this Mother’s Day, and passing that honor onto my children, one of whom is married to a Momma, two who are Mommas themselves, and the youngest who is not yet a Momma, but is developing some mad nurturing skills of her own to be used one day in the future.  In honor of them I want to share a poem I wrote.

My children…

Oh, how we love you
Long before we’d seen your face,
 we loved you
And we prayed that God would fill you with His grace
and come along beside you
And that you’d love and follow Him.

We delight in you!
As we’ve watched you learn and grow,
our eyes were always on you
With each victory we cheer, and thank God
for His goodness to you
And the work he’s doing in you

How we pray for you
As you navigate the storms of life,
remember, we pray for you
That God would comfort, guide, protect and teach
the wonders of his goodness to you
And that you’d follow in His ways.

L. Hedges, 2010

Kalua Pork and Coconut Rice

When my kids were all still at home, and before freezer cooking really caught on, I had three tricks for keeping up with meal prep, the first was double or triple batching, or what I called Cook once, eat twice (or 3x).  When cooking dinner, I’d double or triple the recipe for the evening, and put it in the freezer for one of those days that I didn’t have time, or energy to make a meal from scratch.  This is also handy for cookie dough…Mix once, bake often 🙂

My second trick was “Planned-overs”.  Sundays I would make a large pot roast or roasted chicken (or turkey if I hit a great sale); what wasn’t eaten that night was cut up and placed in the freezer for a recipe or two later in the week.  Beef could be used for stir fry, pot pie, soup or stew, or hash.  Chicken/turkey could be used for chicken salad, pot pie or stir fry as well.  If I had leftover side dishes (veggies, potatoes, rice), that were not enough to use for a whole meal, I didn’t throw them out…I saved them in an ice cream bucket or ziplock in the freezer.  When it accumulated to enough, I made soup.  Waste not, want not, we made it through some very lean years with this approach.

My third trick was YO-YO night, short for “you’re on your own”, otherwise known as “clean out the fridge night”.  Kids could eat whatever they wanted out of the fridge, as long as they fixed it themselves.  We had seasons of YO-YO’ing it…one kid fixing breakfast, another having a sandwich, or cleaning out the leftovers from the night before…it worked well for us, I actually miss those days.

Now that the kids have all left home, I still find myself in this mindset.  Today I made Kahlua Pork with coconut rice.  I’ll have enough pork left over for at least a couple more meals, and the coconut rice might just be gone by tomorrow…YUMMMM!  Here are the recipes:

Coconut Rice:  No different than regular rice, except you substitute coconut milk for half the water called for.  It’s delish!

Kalua Pork:  Pork loin roast, washed, patted dry, pierced all over, and rubbed with 1 TBSP liquid smoke flavor and 1 TBSP sea salt.  Cook on low in slow cooker for 15 hours, turning once midway.  When done, remove meat from crock pot, and shred, adding liquid back in as needed.  Serve over coconut rice, with pineapple on the side.

Common Sense – Justice

common sense 6

From Common Sense by Mother Theodore Guerin (1798-1856)

This piece of advice reminds me of one of my life verses.

Micah 6:8 ~ He has showed you, O man, what is good;
and what does the Lord require of you
but to do justice, and to love kindness,[a]
and to walk humbly with your God?

Another translation reads “do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God”, which is the way I memorized it and sang it for years.  Today, I read the context around this verse, and got a better picture of what this verse is really saying.  Starting with verse 6, there is an introspective question, musing, and finally, in verse 8, the answer:

“With what shall I come before the Lord,
    and bow myself before God on high?
Shall I come before him with burnt offerings,
    with calves a year old?
Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams,
    with ten thousands of rivers of oil?
Shall I give my first-born for my transgression,
    the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?”
He has showed you, O man, what is good;
    and what does the Lord require of you
but to do justice, and to love kindness,
    and to walk humbly with your God?

Psalm 51:15-17 echoes this verse…

O Lord, open thou my lips,
    and my mouth shall show forth thy praise.
16 For thou hast no delight in sacrifice;
    were I to give a burnt offering, thou wouldst not be pleased.
17 The sacrifice acceptable to God[e] is a broken spirit;
    a broken and contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.

Which also echoes 1 Samuel 15:22

And Samuel said, “Has the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams.

Common Sense – How to Be Happy

common sense 5

I love paradoxology.  I believe Jesus and His Apostles did too…consider:

  • Matthew 10:39 – He who finds his life will lose it, and he who loses his life for my sake will find it.
  • John 12:24 – Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.
  • Romans 6:18 ~ and, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness.
  • 2 Cor 12:10 ~ For the sake of Christ, then, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities; for when I am weak, then I am strong.
  • Philippians 3:7,8 ~ But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as refuse, in order that I may gain Christ.
  • James 4:10 ~  Humble yourselves before the Lord and he will exalt you.

…and my favorite, which is the topic of this post, Acts 20:35 ~ In all things I have shown you that by so toiling one must help the weak, remembering the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’”

Because we are self-centered by nature, we can get so caught up in the pursuit of an elusive feeling of happiness, that we lose sight of the goal itself, that is the state of being happy.  The sad fact is, many of the things we pursue that we think will make us happy, only serve to bring us down, and we are stuck with a growing void in our lives, and happiness continues to escape our grasp.

I think Mother Theodore Guerin nailed it when she suggested that we will be happy when we turn the focus away from seeking to acquire it for ourselves, and instead aim to provide happiness to others.  When we are focused on the happiness of another, a strange phenomena occurs, without even trying to gain it for ourselves, it has unpacked and taken up residence in us.  This is a practical application of the teaching in Ecclesiastes 11:1, that of casting your bread upon the waters, and having it return to you after many days.

I am reminded of a sweet little poem that I found when I was a young mother:  Enjoy.

What We Give Away

The more you give, the more you get.
The more you laugh, the less you fret.
The more you do unselfishly,
the more you live abundantly.
The more of everything you share,
the more you’ll always have to spare.
The more you love, the more you’ll find
that life is good and friends are kind.
For only what we give away,
enriches us from day to day.
~Author unknown